Alzheimer’s Drug Failure: Implications for Future R&D in Neuroscience

Why do they bother to develop and test these drugs when it is well-established that the phytocannabinoids generated by the cannabis plant--especially THC and CBD--have unique and unequaled anti-Alzheimer's activities? It is quite clear that these cannabinoids work on several levels to protect the brain from changes that lead to various forms of dementia. THC and CBD work against inflammation and oxidation while neutralizing toxic compounds such as TNF--tumor necrosis factor and cannabinoids dissolve the beta-amyloid plaque while reducing the production of tau scar tissue and triggering the production of healthy replacement neurons. Big pharma just needs to acknowledge that nature does it better. Alzheimer’s Drug Failure: Implications for Future R&D in Neuroscience

Alzheimer’s disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative disease characterized by dementia and memory loss. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, where more than 5 million people are affected. There is clearly a need for more effective therapies that address this and other neurodegenerative diseases; however, the research and development (R&D) efforts put forth by pharmaceutical companies have rarely been successful, as illustrated by the recent failure of the Alzheimer’s drug bapineuzumab in clinical trials.

Johnson & Johnson and Pfizer in separate press releases on August 6, 2012, announced the discontinuation of their joint Phase III clinical development of intravenous (IV) bapineuzumab in mild-to-moderate cases of Alzheimer’s disease. This comes on the heels of disappointing results from the clinical trial Study 301, in which bapineuzumab was being tested in patients who are non-carriers of the ApoE4 (Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4) gene. Results indicated that bapineuzumab did not satisfy either cognitive or functional performance endpoints. These disappointing study results follow similar results announced on July 23 from Study 302, in which bapineuzumab also failed to meet clinical endpoints in ApoE4 carrier patients.

Bapineuzumab IV is an antibody that targets the beta-amyloid protein (A), which is believed to cause brain toxicity and is implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease.

via Alzheimer’s Drug Failure: Implications for Future R&D in Neuroscience.

Alzheimer’s Drug Failure: Implications for Future R&D in Neuroscience

Why do they bother to develop and test these drugs when it is well-established that the phytocannabinoids generated by the cannabis plant--especially THC and CBD--have unique and unequaled anti-Alzheimer's activities? It is quite clear that these cannabinoids work on several levels to protect the brain from changes that lead to various forms of dementia. THC and CBD work against inflammation and oxidation while neutralizing toxic compounds such as TNF--tumor necrosis factor and cannabinoids dissolve the beta-amyloid plaque while reducing the production of tau scar tissue and triggering the production of healthy replacement neurons. Big pharma just needs to acknowledge that nature does it better. Alzheimer’s Drug Failure: Implications for Future R&D in Neuroscience

Alzheimer’s disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative disease characterized by dementia and memory loss. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, where more than 5 million people are affected. There is clearly a need for more effective therapies that address this and other neurodegenerative diseases; however, the research and development (R&D) efforts put forth by pharmaceutical companies have rarely been successful, as illustrated by the recent failure of the Alzheimer’s drug bapineuzumab in clinical trials.

Johnson & Johnson and Pfizer in separate press releases on August 6, 2012, announced the discontinuation of their joint Phase III clinical development of intravenous (IV) bapineuzumab in mild-to-moderate cases of Alzheimer’s disease. This comes on the heels of disappointing results from the clinical trial Study 301, in which bapineuzumab was being tested in patients who are non-carriers of the ApoE4 (Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4) gene. Results indicated that bapineuzumab did not satisfy either cognitive or functional performance endpoints. These disappointing study results follow similar results announced on July 23 from Study 302, in which bapineuzumab also failed to meet clinical endpoints in ApoE4 carrier patients.

Bapineuzumab IV is an antibody that targets the beta-amyloid protein (A), which is believed to cause brain toxicity and is implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease.

via Alzheimer’s Drug Failure: Implications for Future R&D in Neuroscience.

Butter Popcorn Chemical Linked To Alzheimer’s « CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

What is more dangerous than smoking marijuana? Eating buttered popcorn! The cannabinoids in cannabis have been shown to break up the beta-amyloid plaque associated with Alzheimer's disease while a component in artificial butter flavor might actually encourage the depositing of the plaque into brain tissue. I once asked Dr. Andrew Weil, "What's in the butter stuff they put on popcorn in movie theaters?" Dr. Weil replied, "Nothing good!" Butter Popcorn Chemical Linked To Alzheimer’s

August 10, 2012 11:00 AM

NEW YORK (CBS NEWS) - An ingredient used in artificial butter flavoring for popcorn may worsen the effects of an abnormal brain protein that’s been linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

A new study in Chemical Research in Toxicology examined diacetyl (DA), an ingredient used to produce the buttery flavor and smell in microwave popcorn, margarine, candy, baked goods and even pet food. It is also created naturally in fermented drinks like beer, and gives some chardonnay wines its buttery taste, according to the study.

Scientists at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis conducted an analysis of DA, a chemical which previously has been linked to respiratory problems in employees at microwave popcorn and food-flavoring factories. They found that DA has a structure that’s similar to a substance that makes beta-amyloid proteins. Too much amyloid that clumps together to form plaques are a tell-tale marker of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain. The researchers wanted to see whether DA would clump those proteins in a similar fashion to form plaques.

They found DA did lead to an increase in levels of beta-amyloid clumping, leading to toxic effects on nerve cells the scientists grew in a laboratory.

via Butter Popcorn Chemical Linked To Alzheimer’s « CBS Dallas / Fort Worth.

Butter Popcorn Chemical Linked To Alzheimer’s « CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

What is more dangerous than smoking marijuana? Eating buttered popcorn! The cannabinoids in cannabis have been shown to break up the beta-amyloid plaque associated with Alzheimer's disease while a component in artificial butter flavor might actually encourage the depositing of the plaque into brain tissue. I once asked Dr. Andrew Weil, "What's in the butter stuff they put on popcorn in movie theaters?" Dr. Weil replied, "Nothing good!" Butter Popcorn Chemical Linked To Alzheimer’s

August 10, 2012 11:00 AM

NEW YORK (CBS NEWS) - An ingredient used in artificial butter flavoring for popcorn may worsen the effects of an abnormal brain protein that’s been linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

A new study in Chemical Research in Toxicology examined diacetyl (DA), an ingredient used to produce the buttery flavor and smell in microwave popcorn, margarine, candy, baked goods and even pet food. It is also created naturally in fermented drinks like beer, and gives some chardonnay wines its buttery taste, according to the study.

Scientists at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis conducted an analysis of DA, a chemical which previously has been linked to respiratory problems in employees at microwave popcorn and food-flavoring factories. They found that DA has a structure that’s similar to a substance that makes beta-amyloid proteins. Too much amyloid that clumps together to form plaques are a tell-tale marker of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain. The researchers wanted to see whether DA would clump those proteins in a similar fashion to form plaques.

They found DA did lead to an increase in levels of beta-amyloid clumping, leading to toxic effects on nerve cells the scientists grew in a laboratory.

via Butter Popcorn Chemical Linked To Alzheimer’s « CBS Dallas / Fort Worth.