Bladder Cancer Risk Lower in Pot Smokers - Renal and Urology News

Stephan ChoMay 06, 2013                                                        Bladder Cancer Risk Lower in Pot Smokers                                  SAN DIEGO—For the first time, a study has found that cannabis use may be associated with a decreased risk of bladder cancer, researchers reported at the American Urological Association 2013 annual meeting.In a study of nearly 82,000 men, bladder cancer developed in 279 over an 11-year period. Subjects who smoked marijuana, but not tobacco, had a significant 45% decreased risk of bladder cancer compared with those who did not, after adjusting for age, body mass index, and race and ethnicity, according to lead investigator Anil A. Thomas, MD, a researcher with Southern California Permanent Medical Group in Los Angeles. Men who smoked tobacco, but not marijuana, had a significant 52% increased risk, a finding that is consistent with numerous previous studies. Men who smoked both had a 28% increased risk.Of the 82,000 men, 41% reported ever using marijuana and 57% reported tobacco use; 27% reported used both tobacco and marijuana.

via Bladder Cancer Risk Lower in Pot Smokers - Renal and Urology News.

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Bladder Cancer Risk Lower in Pot Smokers - Renal and Urology News

Stephan ChoMay 06, 2013                                                        Bladder Cancer Risk Lower in Pot Smokers                                  SAN DIEGO—For the first time, a study has found that cannabis use may be associated with a decreased risk of bladder cancer, researchers reported at the American Urological Association 2013 annual meeting.In a study of nearly 82,000 men, bladder cancer developed in 279 over an 11-year period. Subjects who smoked marijuana, but not tobacco, had a significant 45% decreased risk of bladder cancer compared with those who did not, after adjusting for age, body mass index, and race and ethnicity, according to lead investigator Anil A. Thomas, MD, a researcher with Southern California Permanent Medical Group in Los Angeles. Men who smoked tobacco, but not marijuana, had a significant 52% increased risk, a finding that is consistent with numerous previous studies. Men who smoked both had a 28% increased risk.Of the 82,000 men, 41% reported ever using marijuana and 57% reported tobacco use; 27% reported used both tobacco and marijuana. via Bladder Cancer Risk Lower in Pot Smokers - Renal and Urology News.

THC/Marijuana fights liver cancer

First we learned that the cannabinoids produced by the cannabis plant fight and kill cancer cells now we are beginning to uncover the mechanisms by which cannabinoids target and kill cancer cells. Alcohol promotes cancer while marijuana suppresses cancer, what's wrong with this picture? I could go buy gallons and gallons of booze legally, but the government will destroy your life if you market marijuana. Cell Death Dis. 2013 May 2;4:e618. doi: 10.1038/cddis.2013.141.Involvement of PPARγ in the antitumoral action of cannabinoids on hepatocellular carcinoma.Vara D, Morell C, Rodríguez-Henche N, Diaz-Laviada I.SourceBiochemistry and Molecular Biology Unit, Department of System Biology, School of Medicine, University ofAlcala, 28871 Madrid, Spain.AbstractCannabinoids exert antiproliferative effects in a wide range of tumoral cells, including hepatocellular carcinoma HCC cells. In this study, we examined whether the PPARγ-activated pathway contributed to the antitumor effect of two cannabinoids, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol THC and JWH-015, against HepG2 and HUH-7 HCC cells. Both cannabinoids increased the activity and intracellular level of PPARγ mRNA and protein, which was abolished by the PPARγ inhibitor GW9662. Moreover, genetic ablation with small interfering RNA siRNA, as well as pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ decreased the cannabinoid-induced cell death and apoptosis. Likewise, GW9662 totally blocked the antitumoral action of cannabinoids in xenograft-induced HCC tumors in mice. In addition, PPARγ knockdown with siRNA caused accumulation of the autophagy markers LC3-II and p62, suggesting that PPARγ is necessary for the autophagy flux promoted by cannabinoids. Interestingly, downregulation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-related protein tribbles homolog 3 TRIB3 markedly reduced PPARγ expression and induced p62 accumulation, which was counteracted by overexpression of PPARγ in TRIB3-knocked down cells. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time that the antiproliferative action of the cannabinoids THC and JWH-015 on HCC, in vitro and in vivo, are modulated by upregulation of PPARγ-dependent pathways.

via Involvement of PPARγ in the antitumoral actio... [Cell Death Dis. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI.

OnMedica - News - Alcohol major contributor to cancer deaths

Marijuana has powerful anti-cancer activity. Alcohol is a powerful cancer promoting agent. If you're going to drink, you damn well need to be toking too! Alcohol major contributor to cancer deaths

A drink a day can increase breast cancer risk by 5%2     Even light drinking raises breast cancer risk   Alcohol major contributor to cancer deaths                                                                                     15 February 2013                                Alcohol is a major contributor to cancer deaths and years of potential life lost, researchers have found.These findings, published in the American Journal of Public Health, also show that reducing alcohol consumption is an important cancer prevention strategy as alcohol is a known carcinogen even when consumed in small quantities.Previous studies consistently have shown that alcohol consumption is a significant risk factor for cancers of the mouth, throat, oesophagus and liver. More recent research has shown that alcohol also increases the risk of cancers of the colon, rectum and female breast. Estimates have shown that alcohol accounts for about 4% of all cancer-related deaths worldwide.In this new study, researchers from the Boston University School of Medicine BUSM and Boston University School of Public Health BUSPH examined recent data from the US on alcohol consumption and cancer mortality. They found that alcohol resulted in approximately 20,000 cancer deaths annually, accounting for about 3.5% of all cancer deaths in the US.Breast cancer was the most common cause of alcohol-attributable cancer deaths in women, accounting for approximately 6,000 deaths annually, or about 15% of all breast cancer deaths. Cancers of the mouth, throat and oesophagus were common causes of alcohol-attributable cancer mortality in men, resulting in a total of about 6,000 annual deaths.The researchers also found that each alcohol-related cancer death accounted for an average of 18 years of potential life lost. In addition, although higher levels of alcohol consumption led to a higher cancer risk, average consumption of 1.5 drinks per day or less accounted for 30% of all alcohol-attributable cancer deaths."The relationship between alcohol and cancer is strong, but is not widely appreciated by the public and remains underemphasised even by physicians," said senior author Timothy Naimi from the Department of Medicine at BUSM."Alcohol is a big preventable cancer risk factor that has been hiding in plain sight," he added.

via OnMedica - News - Alcohol major contributor to cancer deaths.